So you have a bad habit — smoking, eating too much, biting your nails — and you’d like to break the habit. Or maybe you don’t have a bad habit you’d like to break, but you need help with achieving your goals. Can hypnotherapy work? Perhaps, perhaps not. Last week I met a certified hypnotist studying advanced hypnotherapy. He had previously given a presentation to The Healing Cooperative – Fairfax Chapter and was offering the opportunity to experience hypnotherapy.

Being very interested in alternative and complementary medicine, I decided to schedule an appointment. In one sense, John and I are on parallel paths — we are at the beginning of our journey to learn our chosen healing modality. He witnessed hypnosis and saw positive results and I saw how Cellular Response could help people. (See my previous posts here and here).

After the hypnotherapy experience, I felt very relaxed for the rest of the night. The next day I felt that my mind was clear and I felt a sense of direction. It helped me to see where I could go with my Cellular Response practice. I was amazed at how well hypnotherapy worked for me even in a very short session.

First, I filled out a simple questionnaire with yes or no answers. From this questionnaire, he guided me with questions then led me down the path to clearly see how I am helping people to heal and how they in turn can contribute to helping others. This was simple and beautiful.

What I recall about hypnosis is whatever I saw as a young child. It started with, “You’re getting sleepy….” Does this ring a bell? Or maybe hypnotists still do that for shows. Personally, I’ve not seen anything like that recently. In my session, I was seated in a chair with my arms outstretched on the table in front of me and he asked me to tap my right index finger on the table and to put it on autopilot. Then he guided my left arm until it met my forehead. Most of the time was spent in guiding my thoughts and before opening my eyes, my tapping was stopped and I was back to my original position.

Hypnotherapy is probably not for everyone and in many cases (such as to stop smoking), one session would probably not be adequate. John is currently practicing law and is preparing to possibly start a second career helping people via hypnotherapy. I left the session with a list of 145 ways that hypnotherapy may be able to help you. He’s even helping a couple of people to improve their golf game. Have you used a hypnotherapist? How did it work for you?

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